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LOOM SEMINARS

Usually every year researchers present there work in a monthly LOOM group seminar at Liverpool John Moores University. The LOOM group conduct a seminar every month, and every seminar contain two presentations from two researchers. The LOOM seminars for year 2018 have started in the 14th of March. We hereby will present their research titles, abstracts, and photos of the seminar when available.

14/03/2018

In the seminar  conducted on the 14th of March 2018 by Dr Charley Lersteau and Mr Ahmed Adnan Makki:

Dr Charley Lersteau

A heuristic framework for stack loading problems in container terminals

Stack loading problems arise in many logistics applications such as container terminals, container ships, steel yards or warehouses. We are especially interested in improving efficiency of container terminals. We aim at loading a sequence of items into a set of stacks subject to constraints. Items are accessed in last-in first-out order using a crane, so any target item at the bottom requires reshuffling of upper items. Then finding a loading strategy reducing the number of crane moves is an important challenge in order to decrease operational costs and delays. We introduce a framework to solve efficiently this problem as well as an empirical analysis of several variants of this framework.

Mr Ahmed Adnan Makki

DYNAMIC ALIGNMENT Capacity Estimation by Utilising A NOVAL PCE ESTIMATION METHOD

The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of heavy goods vehicles (HGV) that are carrying ISO shipping containers on the road traffic flow (TF). The objective is to estimate the available capacity for HGVs on the road to accommodate the demand increase due to the container terminal expansion. The author will present two novel methods for estimating the HGV effect on the traffic flow. The first one will be the deceleration and acceleration distance PCE (DAD-PCE) method that estimates the HGV’s deceleration and acceleration performances effect on TF. The second one will be the Dynamic Alignment Capacity Estimation (DAC). It is a methodology of determining the dynamic available capacity and an optimisation model for rescheduling the departure of container trucks at container ports for the main road leading to the Liverpool container port in the UK. The DAD-PCE method will determine the PCE values based on maintaining safety and traffic flow speed, and determining the stopping distance necessary between the following and leading vehicles that would provide enough time and space for the vehicle to stop and the required acceleration distance for maintaining TF average speed. The author will determine the dynamic available road capacity by utilizing the DAC method to provide an accurate estimation for every hour that is suitable for operational and strategical planning, especially for roads with a high percentage of HGVs. However, the estimation methods are suitable for every road and street and at any location in UK.

11/04/2018

In the seminar  conducted on the 11th of April 2018 by Mr Cameron Kelly and Mr Danial Yazdani:

Mr Cameron Kelly

INVESTIGATION INTO THE USES OF LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS AS AN ALTERNATIVE METHOD OF SELECTING TIDAL POWER SCHEMES

The objective of this presentation is to provide an overview of the research in to the uses of LCA as an alternative method of site selection covering tidal flows, the three methodologies (LCA, Cost-benefit analysis and Feasibility study), and detailing how they will be combined in to the finished site selection tool.

Mr Danial Yazdani

DYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION PROBLEMS

Many real-world optimization problems are subject to changing conditions over time, so being able to optimize in a dynamic environment is important. Changes may affect the object function, the problem instance, and/or constraints, e.g., due to the arrival of new tasks, the breakdown of machines, the change of economic and financial conditions, and the variance of available resources. In this presentation, we describe various types of dynamic optimization problems in continues environments and optimization methods for solving them.

02/05/2018

In the seminar  conducted on the 2nd of May 2018 by Mr Igor Deplano and a joint presentation by Dr Ozkan Ugurlu and Mr Serdar Yildiz :

Mr Igor Deplano

MHKP: FROM KNAPSACK 0/1 TO INTEGER KNAPSACK, GENERATING CUTTING PLANES

The Multiple Heterogeneous Knapsack Problem (MHKP) contains a Knapsack 0/1 core problem. Exploiting the concept of class equivalences we map the 0/1 core into an integer knapsack problem. The Bender’s decomposition is used to generating covers for the feasible and unfeasible set. We compared neural networks and support vector machines; the task is to predict feasibility. The final aim is to produce a technique for generating cutting planes with the minimal sampling.

Dr Ozkan Ugurlu and Mr Serdar Yildiz 

MODIFIED HUMAN FACTOR ANALYSIS AND CLASIFICATION SYSTEM FOR PASSENGER VESSEL ACCIDENTS (HFACS-PV)

With the increase in the carrying capacity of passenger vessels parallel to technological developments over the last 25 years, accidents resulting in loss of lives have increased. Thus, accidents involving passenger vessels have become a major issue of concern in the maritime industry. In this study, we examined 70 ship collision & contact accidents involving passenger vessels between 1991 and 2015. Unlike other studies in the literature, this investigation proposes a customized Human Factors Analysis and Classification System for Passenger Vessel Accidents (HFACS-PV) to facilitate analyzing the human factor in passenger vessel accidents. In addition to the core HFACS structure, we have defined an additional Environment level; the violations framework has been divided into the three sub-categories of rule violations, procedure violations, and abuse of authority, instead of the two broad categories of routine and exceptional violations. Abuse of authority is an intentional violation made knowingly and willfully. Therefore, abuse of authority was considered separately. Furthermore, minor modifications have been made to the headings under the second level of HFACS-Preconditions for Unsafe Acts for compliance with the maritime industry. It has therefore become easier to analyze and interpret accidents involving passenger vessels.

06/06/2018

In the seminar  conducted on the 6th of June 2018 by Mr Atiyah Atiyah and Ms Shiqi Fan:

Mr Atiyah Atiyah

DEVELOPING A NOVEL MARINE PILOT’S RELIABILITY INDEX (MPRI) USING A MIXED-METHOD APPROACH

The economy is significantly growing worldwide, and 80% of the world’s trade (by volume) moves through seaports. However, the growth in global trades has led to a significant growth in marine accidents due to ship/port interface or human involvement. Moreover, a marine pilot conducts a pilotage operation in a dynamic working environment with variable operational objectives and priorities. Thus, a proper understanding of a variety of key factors influencing a pilot’s reliability is vital in all the high-risk industries including marine and maritime industries. This study aims to develop a quantitative marine pilot’s reliability assessment tool, known as the Marine Pilot’s Reliability Index (MPRI), which will help the decision-makers to identify the effects of these factors on pilot’s reliability. Although human reliability has been investigated in different disciplines, there is no consensus on the selected criteria. Therefore, the researcher has obtained a set of data via a field trip in one of the major marine port. The nature of the data necessitate selecting the most appropriate research philosophy to treat the collected data more efficiently. Therefore, this research has use an exploratory mixed-method approach for developing the proposed MPRIs’ in a sequential form. At the first stage, a field observation to a marine pilotage operation was conducted to identify the main key players. This followed by conducting semi-structured focus-group interviews with marine pilots, and collecting historic port marine pilotage accidents occurred at this port. Secondly, the collected data were analysed qualitatively using a thematic analysis approach for developing the MPRIs tool. Finally, for integrating and examine the feasibility of the identified themes, the Delphi technique were used for that purpose and the importance weights assigned to each criterion using analytical hierarchy process (AHP). As a result, four main dimensions with 13 sub-criterions were identified.

Ms  Shiqi Fan

EFFECTS OF SEAFARERS’ EMOTION ON HUMAN PERFORMANCE USING BRIDGE SIMULATION

Abstract: 75-96% of maritime accidents are caused by human and organizational factors. Seafarers’ emotion may degrade the affectivity of human behaviour when tasks in on board environment are complex and demanding. This study was concerned with the relationship between seafarers’ emotion and occurring events in navigation. In the first section, two types of emotions are induced by the sound clips of the International Affective Digitized Sounds (IADS). In the second section, emotion is recognized by the Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier, as well as self-rated after the crew-qualified test in a bridge simulator. The results concerning officers’ emotion in a bridge simulator test reveal that seafarers’ emotion in maritime operations, relating to events exposure, affects their behaviour. In addition, negative emotion has a higher likelihood of contributing to human errors than positive emotion.

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Newton Institutional Links project has been shortlisted for the prestigious Newton Prize

Our Newton Institutional Links project “UK­Vietnam Institutional Link in Digital Innovation for Sustainable Maritime Logistics in Vietnam has been shortlisted for the prestigious Newton Prize, out of over 150 applications. Below is the quote from the news (more…)

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Research Seminar – Wednesday 5th July 2017 – Liverpool Logistics, Offshore & Marine Research Institute (LOOM)

On 5th July 2017, Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) organised a research seminar as an activity of the Newton Institutional Links project “UK-­Vietnam Institutional Link in Digital Innovation for Sustainable Maritime Logistics in Vietnam” to present some of LJMU’s work on port efficiency in collaboration with port partners in Vietnam. The seminar were delivered by Dr. Charly Lersteau and Dr. Iffat Gheyas from LJMU.
Over 20 attendees from academia and industry attended the event.
Titles and abstracts of their talks are detailed below.

Simulation of operations in Vietnamese VIP Greenport

Dr. Iffat Gheyas Port authorities need to make a variety of inter-related decisions during daily operations at a container terminal. The goal of this study is to develop a decision support tool that supports the terminal operators of Vietnamese VIP Greenport in decision making processes to minimize the ship turnaround time, the congestions on the roads inside the terminal, the average dwelling time of containers at the storage blocks and maximize the average crane productivity. The study will be carried out in three phases: (a) modelling the current state of the port, (b) Simulating port operation using 3D visualization technology and (c) optimizing the operational process. Most of the existing research focus on a particular operation. The goal of current study is to use an integrated approach for optimizing the operational process at container terminal. This is an ongoing work. In this talk, I will discuss the progress made to date.”

Dr. Iffat Gheyas


Optimising the container stacking process in an Asian port

Stack loading problems arise in many logistics applications such as container terminals, container ships, steel yards or warehouses. We are especially motivated by improving efficiency of container terminals. In this presentation, we aim at loading a sequence of items into a set of stacks subject to constraints. Items are accessed in last-in first-out order using a crane, so any target item at the bottom requires reshuffling of upper items. Then finding a loading strategy reducing the number of crane moves is an important challenge in order to decrease operational costs and delays. We introduce mathematical models and heuristics to solve this problem, and experimental results on random and real-case scenarios.

 

Dr. Charly Lersteau


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